You Might Like

CDC Issues MASSIVE Warning on FLU Not Seen In Over 27 Years


Flu season has come early this year.

 

That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC said Friday that flu season has seen its earliest start in 10 years.

A strain of the flu that’s particularly tough on kids is showing up early, too, for the first time in 27 years.

There’s significant flu activity in all but 12 states, and it’s hitting the southeast and southwest the hardest.

Experts say the early flu season is even more reason to get the flu shot if you haven’t already.

Flu symptoms (from the CDC)

Influenza (flu) can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Flu is different from a cold. Flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:

  • fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • muscle or body aches
  • headaches
  • fatigue (tiredness)
  • some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

Influenza Virus Characterization

CDC performs genetic and antigenic characterization of U.S. viruses submitted from state and local health laboratories using Right Size Roadmap submission guidance. These data are used to compare how similar the currently circulating influenza viruses are to the reference viruses used for developing new influenza vaccines and to monitor evolutionary changes that continually occur in circulating influenza. CDC also tests susceptibility of influenza viruses to antiviral medications including the neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir) and the PA endonuclease inhibitor baloxavir.

CDC genetically characterized 877 influenza viruses collected in the U.S. from September 29, 2019, to January 4, 2020.

Virus Subtype or Lineage Genetic Characterization
Total No. of Subtype/Lineage Tested          Clade Number (% of subtype/lineage tested)          Subclade Number (% of subtype/lineage tested)
A/H1 260
6B.1A 260 (100%)
A/H3 231
3C.2a 228 (98.7%) 2a1 228 (98.7%)
   2a2 0
    2a3 0
2a4 0
3C.3a 3 (1.3%) 3a 3 (1.3%)
B/Victoria 353
V1A 353 (100%) V1A 0
V1A.1 33 (9.3%)
V1A.3 320 (90.7%)
B/Yamagata 33
Y3 33 (100%)

CDC antigenically characterizes a subset of influenza viruses by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) or neutralization based Focus Reduction assays (FRA). Antigenic drift is evaluated by comparing antigenic properties of cell-propagated reference viruses representing currently recommended vaccine components with those of cell-propagated circulating viruses. CDC antigenically characterized 167 influenza viruses collected in the United States from September 29, 2019, to January 4, 2020.

Influenza A Viruses

  • A (H1N1)pdm09: 66 A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were antigenically characterized by HI with ferret antisera, and all were antigenically similar (reacting at titers that were within 4-fold of the homologous virus titer) to cell-propagated A/Brisbane/02/2018-like reference viruses representing the A(H1N1)pdm09 component for the 2019-20 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines.
  • A (H3N2): 41 A(H3N2) viruses were antigenically characterized by FRA with ferret antisera, and 14 (34.1%) were antigenically similar to cell-propagated A/Kansas/14/2017-like reference viruses representing the A(H3N2) component for the 2019-20 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines.

Influenza B Viruses

  • B/Victoria: 50 B/Victoria lineage viruses, including viruses from both co-circulating sub-clades, were antigenically characterized by HI with ferret antisera, and 29 (58%) were antigenically similar to cell-propagated B/Colorado/06/2017-like reference viruses representing the B/Victoria component for the 2019-20 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines.
  • B/Yamagata: 10 B/Yamagata lineage viruses were antigenically characterized by HI with ferret antisera, and all 10 (100%) were antigenically similar to cell-propagated B/Phuket/3073/2013-like reference viruses representing the B/Yamagata component for the 2019-20 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines.

CDC assesses susceptibility of influenza viruses to the antiviral medications oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, and baloxavir using next generation sequence analysis supplemented by laboratory assays. Viruses collected in the United States since September 29, 2019, were tested for antiviral susceptibility as follows:

Antiviral Medication Total Viruses A/H1 A/H3 B/Victoria B/Yamagata
Neuraminidase Inhibitors
Oseltamivir Viruses Tested 821 239 218 335 29
Reduced Inhibition (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%)
Highly Reduced Inhibition 1 (0.1%) 1 (0.4%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%)
Peramivir Viruses Tested 821 239 218 335 29
Reduced Inhibition (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%)
Highly Reduced Inhibition 1 (0.1%) 1 (0.4%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%)
Zanamivir Viruses Tested 821 239 218 335 29
Reduced Inhibition 1 (0.1%) (0.0%) (0.0%) 1 (0.3%) (0.0%)
Highly Reduced Inhibition (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%)
PA Endonuclease Inhibitor
Baloxavir Viruses Tested 827 238 217 335 37
Reduced Susceptibility (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%) (0.0%)

The highest rate of hospitalization is among adults aged ≥65, followed by children aged 0-4 years and adults aged 50-64 years.

Age Group 2019-2020 Season
Cumulative Rate per 100,000 Population
Overall 14.6
0-4 years 26.8
5-17 years 8.3
18-49 years 8.2
50-64 years 17.0
65+ years 33.3

Among 549 hospitalized adults with information on underlying medical conditions, 90.3% had at least one reported underlying medical condition, the most commonly reported were cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorder, and obesity. Among 154 hospitalized children with information on underlying medical conditions, 46.1% had at least one underlying medical condition; the most commonly reported was asthma. Among 116 hospitalized women of childbearing age (15-44 years) with information on pregnancy status, 30.2% were pregnant.

Click on graph to launch interactive tool2

View Full Screen
Additional hospitalization surveillance information for current and past seasons and additional age groups:
Surveillance Methods | FluView Interactive

Pneumonia and Influenza (P&I) Mortality Surveillance

Based on National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) mortality surveillance data available on January 9, 2020, 5.8% of the deaths occurring during the week ending December 28, 2019 (week 52) were due to P&I. This percentage is below the epidemic threshold of 6.9% for week 52.

INFLUENZA Virus Isolated
View Chart Data | View Full Screen
Additional pneumonia and influenza mortality surveillance information for current and past seasons:
Surveillance Methods | FluView Interactive

 

Read more COD and CDC

Previous US Marine Weapons Master Instructor '4 Reasons I Don't Trust The 1911 With My Life'
Next NEIGHBORS ARE PISSED AFTER SEEING THIS SIGN A VETERAN PUT IN HIS YARD [PHOTOS]